International Relations

Accompanying today’s Monday vase is an assortment of objects from across the world, lining up in peace and harmony to show Boris just how international relationships should be done. Alongside the homely arrangement of buddleia, sweetpeas, foxglove and lavender upon the continental shelf above our fireplace, we have a Chinese hot water bottle, a Swedish jug, a Vietnamese gong, two cogitating African gentlemen, and just out of the picture, my late grandmother-in-law’s Japanese Buddha.

The snippings from the vase couldn’t go to waste, so I found them a jug and added scabious, salvia, lavender, and geranium.

In a vase on Monday is hosted by the inimitable Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.

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25 Comments

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  1. That’s a great dark buddleia, beautifully matched to the sweet pea. And I also like that the jug picks out the creamy/yellow of the youngest foxglove buds.
    Oh Boris, you have so much to learn…

  2. Simply stunning and so beautifully done!

  3. Love the dark purple with the rich yellow–all skillfully arranged.

  4. What an impact! So good!

  5. Lovely dark Buddleia and interesting that the pollinators prefer the other colour.

  6. The buddleia is such a delightfully dark shade and the sweet peas work with it brilliantly – I love your eclectic international collection too! Thanks for sharing

  7. Speaking of International Relations for some reason I never get your posts until Tuesday!? Lovely vase and artifacts. I have a question, do the Foxglove and Buddleia usually bloom at the same time?

    • I can’t explain that… You are thousands of miles to the west of me so it should be the other way round, you should get them earlier on in the day than I have posted them, if that makes any sense. Here, buddleia comes into bloom around mid-July (we are about 3 weeks later than the south of the UK) and my foxgloves have been going since early July and are just going over about now. This will probably be the last foxglove bloom I can pick this year.

      • Weird, sometimes WordPress stats, etc make no sense. I get the English and Italian blogs on Monday!
        I am from about 600 miles north of where I currently live (South Florida) and we grew Foxglove as a cool season biennial, they would flower early spring (sometimes February) the Buddleias in the summer. Your Buddleias are twice as beautiful as any I ever grew. The benefits of winter?!

      • Foxgloves in February! That sounds quite extraordinary to a Brit. Wonderful how plants adapt their circannual rhythms to different latitudes and hemispheres. Thank you for that kind comment about the buddleia. We chopped it back quite a bit this year and I am sure that helped it along. We also have very cool, wet summers, which preserves flowers well (if they don’t get soggy).

      • The thought of Foxgloves as a summer flower is equally weird to me! Year old plants are sold in the fall for early flowers in spring.

      • I suspect a good deal of our summer flowers would not last beyond spring in your neck of the woods. And many of your wonderful summer plants would be very disappointed with the season that we call ‘summer’ here!

  8. A beautiful vase and some interesting objects from around the globe. Especially love that last photo of your smaller arrangement. 🙂

  9. A lovely dark buddleia, I love them, but they make me cough when I prune them. Don’ t pin your hopes on Boris learning anything about international relations, even with such a fine example.

  10. Oh that’s a most fine cosmopolitan collection of flowers and curios Joanna. I’m not sure whether Boris would succumb, unlike another former ex- Mayor of London but you’ve done your very best. Love the yellow vase. I would be interested to hear how long the geranium lasts once picked.

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