Where are all my birds?

I was hoping by now to be able to show you photographs of birds feeding from my bird table, but sadly this is not to be. I even had my camera set up with its long lens by the window in hopes of capturing the envisioned hoardes of sparrows, tits, blackbirds etc. fluttering about my homemade bird feeders and snatching at the much appreciated morsels of goodness. But since that one robin I saw taking food the day after I’d put the first lot of food out, I’ve seen no more birds whatsoever. I can’t imagine why not. Perhaps they just haven’t discovered it yet, or it’s the wrong kind of food, or they just don’t like me. Who knows? I can hear birds twittering away in other peoples gardens across the backgreen, but as far as our garden is concerned it’s Silent Spring.

Having said all that, I did discover one particular problem with my birdfeeders that I should have foreseen: they are not rain proof. I have now rehung the wee jug so that rain is much less likely to get inside; as for the little dish, this is harder, and I am just trying to put small quantities of food out more frequently and empty the dish whenever it fills up with rain, until I can think of what to do about making a roof for it. Another problem is the difficulty of unwiring the wires to take the feeders down to clean and replenish them. I have now rehung them with a more practicable arrangement of wires, and am just hoping they stay up now as it has been pretty windy.

My mother read a letter in the paper from a man who put nyjer seeds out for the goldfinches and it took three years for the goldfinches to discover them. I wonder if I might have more luck with attracting bees instead.

One Comment

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  1. What you need in your bird feeders is drainage holes. With the right drill and great care it should be possible to make one in the little jug (you’ll probably have to drill opposite the handle and hang it the other way up) and several in the dish. When rehung, the feeders could be cleaned in situ using a jugful of water and an old washing-up brush.

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